Category Archives: Development

Quartz.NET, Castle Windsor – LifeStyle Per Job (Scoped)

If you have ever tried to use Quartz.NET (a famous job-scheduling library) with Castle Windsor (IoC/DI container) you might need to register a component whose life-style should be bound to the job itself (LifestylePerJob). There are plenty of alternatives available which all have the same characteristics – they do not work:

  • LifestylePerThread – does not reset the thread when running a new job
  • BoundTo<Job>() – does not support typed factories when resolved inside the job
  • BoundTo<object>() – does not support typed factories when resolved inside the job
  • Quartz.IJobFactory + LifestyleScoped – does not support typed factories when resolved into the job (the scope from JobFactory is not propagated inside the job!)

There is a “simple” workaround for such scenarios. You can use LifestyleScoped but you have to begin/end the scope in the job.

If you use the job itself just as a plumbing class where the work itself is encapsulated in a separate service (and you should do this) then you can simply inject both a service-factory and the kernel and then do the scope-work in the job itself:

public class MyJob : IJob
{
    private readonly IServiceFactory<MyService> myServiceFactory;
    private readonly IKernel kernel;

    public MyJob(IServiceFactory<MyService> myServiceFactory, IKernel kernel)
    {
        this.myServiceFactory = myServiceFactory;
        this.kernel = kernel;
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        using (var scope = kernel.BeginScope())
        {
            // use your way to work with factories ;-)
            using (var myService = myServiceFactory.Create())
            {
                myService.DoWork();
            }
            // BTW: we have an extension method
            myServiceFactory.ExecuteAction(service => service.DoWork());
        }
    }
}

…the MyService class has all the dependencies you need and as you use it using the factory it behaves as the pseudo-resolution-root for this scenario. You might use the kernel.Resolve+Release in the job but I always prefer not to… ;-)

References

Azure: How to solve Azure SQL “database is not currently available”

Developers sometimes ask me about “database is not currently available” error when using Azure SQL and Entity Framework 6. In this article I explain why happens this error and how to solve it easily.

Case Study

Let’s start with the real life example from our customer:

„… we detected an error in our logs: „Database ‘XXX’ on server ‘XXX’ is not currently available.”. It happens usually once a week and sometimes it happens more times during a night. Should we worry about it? We want to move the database from US region do EU and move all databases under elastic pool, so that maybe we do not have to solve this issue now…“

Theory about Azure SQL

Azure SQL service is a typical PaaS service so that developer doesn’t have to worry about the platform. OS updates, security updates and other things are automatically solved on the provider side. The problem is that sometimes SQL Server reconfiguration is needed and in this case short downtime occurs. It happens during updating OS or when an issue occurred (process or load balancing failure). Most of the downtimes are very short (threshold about 60 seconds). Most of the developers do not know about this issue and just a few developers experienced this error but they do not solve it because the error is exceptional.

Solution

If you want to solve this issue, you must implement retry logic. If you use Entity Framework 6 or EF Core, the solution is very easy. Developers in Microsoft know about this behavior and they prepared easy solution in ORMs.

Connection Resiliency / Retry Logic (EF 6)

In case of EF 6 you must allow Execution Strategy and choose SqlAzureExecutionStrategy. Complete configuration looks like this:

public class MyConfiguration : DbConfiguration 
{ 
    public MyConfiguration() 
    { 
        SetExecutionStrategy( 
            "System.Data.SqlClient", 
            () => new SqlAzureExecutionStrategy(1, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(30))); 
    } 
}

Source and another information you can find in article:

Connection Resiliency (EF Core)

If you work with EF Core, you can analogicaly configure your project in the place where you register all services.

// Startup.cs from any ASP.NET Core Web API
public class Startup
{
    // Other code ...
    public IServiceProvider ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        // ...
        services.AddDbContext(options =>
        {
            options.UseSqlServer(Configuration["ConnectionString"],
            sqlServerOptionsAction: sqlOptions =>
            {
                sqlOptions.EnableRetryOnFailure(
                maxRetryCount: 5,
                maxRetryDelay: TimeSpan.FromSeconds(30),
                errorNumbersToAdd: null);
            });
        });
    }
//...
}

Source and another information you can find in article:

As you can see in examples, implementation is a piece of cake.

Tip: Microsoft LogParser [Studio] superfast SQL-like querying of any log file

LogParser (download) is a command line tool from Microsoft which allows you to query any text-based log file using SQL-like syntax. The basic list of supported formats is quite impressive: IISW3C, NCSA, IIS, IISODBC, BIN, IISMSID, HTTPERR, URLSCAN, CSV, TSV, W3C, XML, EVT, ETW, NETMON, REG, ADS, TEXTLINE, TEXTWORD, FS and COM.

I usually use it for querying IIS Log files and believe me it is super-fast. On my Lenovo X1 i7/16GB/SSD it was able to query 8.97GB of log files 2min 12sec!

SELECT
    Date,
    TO_INT(COALESCE(EXTRACT_VALUE(cs-uri-query, 'id'), EXTRACT_VALUE(cs-uri-query, 'SouborSablonyID'))) AS SouborID,
    COUNT(*) AS Total
FROM '[LOGFILEPATH]'
WHERE (cs-uri-stem = '/business/sablony/soubor-partner.aspx') OR (cs-uri-stem = '/business/sablony/soubor.aspx')
GROUP BY Date, SouborID
ORDER BY Total DESC

Output to database

It is not only able to query the logs but you can use it to push the results to SQL database and many other supported data-sources (CSV, XML, …), e.g.

C:\Program Files (x86)\Log Parser 2.2>logparser “SELECT * INTO iisLogs FROM c:\temp\logs\*.log ” -i:iisw3c -o:SQL -server:localhost -database:MyLogs -username:sa -password:sa -createTable: ON

Note: If you want a plain import of log to DB (without any filtering, projection or aggregation) consider using Import Flat File… wizard from SQL Management Studio for better performance. If you want to use LogParser for feeding your DB, check the transactionRowCount option to batch uploaded rows into single transcation (e.g. -transactionRowCount:-1)

Is there any GUI for LogParser?

LogParser itself has always been a command-line utility. As an alternative it has a COM API which allows you to use it from your application. This API has been used to produce several GUIs which make the use of LogParser much easier:

  • Microsoft LogParser Studio (download) is a Microsoft product which brings not only the GUI itself but is shipped with many (181) pre-defined query templates for different log types.
    2017-11-28_2-46-39
  • Log Parser Lizard GUI is another free tool (with a paid Pro edition) produced outside Microsoft which might be even more powerful. I haven’t tested it yet but it looks promising for those of you who need to play with the logs on daily basis.

References

You might find following links useful when starting to play with LogParser:

Conclusion to my #NoResharper challenge with Visual Studio 2017

With Visual Studio 2017 being released early this year I decided to go for my regular #NoResharper challenge. With every single major version of VS I try to use it without Resharper to find the best setup for me. In general I like the coding productivity boosts Resharper gives me but I hate the way it takes over basic VS features completely and the performance & stability drop it costs. Therefor I regularly try to find a light-weight alternative to R# by using plain VS with only a few reliable extensions.

In the past I used to use Resharper heavily – it was definitely a “must-have” with Visual Studio .NET and Visual Studio 2003. The VS 2005 came with refactorings and I was satisfied working without Resharper till VS2013 when I gave R# another try. There were so many useful productivity boosts not covered by Visual Studio itself or any other stable and light-weight extension (unbeatable T-navigation, Go to definition, Introduce and initialize a field from constructor parameter, Adjust namespaces, etc.). R# returned to my box to better support modern development techniques (IoC/DI, unit-testing, …).

With Visual Studio 2017, it’s improved T-navigation (Go to…), with help of Roslyn-based refactorings (e.g. Roslynator) and ever-coming updates with new productivity improvements I decided to go without Resharper and after 10 months I can confirm I’m still happy with this decision.

My current Visual Studio setup consists of:

When I check this list of extensions it really seams I might be able to live with plain VS without any major pain! The biggest surprise for me came when I was gathering these items from VS and realized that the Roslynator extension is disabled. (I disabled it after installing the VS2017 15.3 update to test the new Refactorings, Code Generation and Quick Actions.)

UPDATE: If you miss CamelHumps, you might give a try to Subword Navigation extension.

 

 

 

Azure: Disable outbound traffic from VNet to internet except the Azure Services

Virtual Networks and Virtual Network Interfaces in Azure could have own Network Security Groups. Every group consists from security rules which enable or disable traffic by defined rules. In some cases we want to disable outbound traffic to the internet but unfortunately this means we disable traffic to various Azure services which are out of our virtual network. In this article I’ll explain how to solve this issue in a few steps.

Meet the NSG and NSG Rules

NSG (Network Security Group) is a security rule set. Every isolated security rule enable or disable traffic based on the configuration. Configuration consists from IP address and protocol or kind of service (Virtual Network, Internet, Load Balancer). There are some examples on the image below:

ukazka-nsg-rules

All the rules are applicated by their priority (higher numbers are applied first). Your own security rules you can define with priority 0-4096. At the end of the rules set we can see Default Rules which are defined everytime and they have significantly lower priority (priority 60000 and higher).

ukazka-vlastniho-pravidla

This Default Rules cannot be deleted neither changed but logically they can be overrided by another rules with higher priority. See the example below. Default rule with low priority is overriden by custom rule. This is good example how to disable all the outbound traffic to the internet.

zakazani-konektivity-outbound-inet

The rule set (NSG) is applicable to Virtual Networks or Virtual Network Interfaces (NIC). In the real world we apply the rule set for the whole Virtual Network together with specific rules for Virtual Machines (each Virtual Machine can only have one NIC).

How to disable outbound traffic and solve troubles with Azure services availability

Ideally we could create Virtual Network and disable all the outbound trafic to the internet. The problem is that most of the Azure services could not be assigned to our Virtual Network (they are available on the internet) so that we cannot disable all the trafic. Fortunately we can apply a few rules:

  1. By default all the outbound traffic is allowed (we cannot delete this rule)
  2. We‘ll add new rule and disable all the outbound traffic (this is way how to override rule no 1)
  3. We’ll add new rule set and allow outbound traffic to IP addresses of Azure Services (we partially override rule no 2)

It seems to be easy but the problem is we never know which IP addresses will have Azure Services assigned. We usually do not care about it because we typically use just DNS. The best solution is to allow outbound traffic to all the IP addresses of all the Azure Services. List of all IP ranges we can download as XML:

seznam-ip-adres-datovych-center-a-sluzeb-v-azure

Restriction for NSG (max 200 security rules)

There is another issue we have to solve. NSG has restriction for maximum of 200 security rules and the West Europe region use over 400 IP ranges. It means we must contact Microsoft Azure Support and request for increasing limit. Finally, Microsoft allows us to manage 500 security rules. More about Azure limits you can read on:

Design: Automation with Azure PowerShell and VSTS Release Management

How to add over the 400 security rules? By hand? Nooo.. IP Ranges could change and we need to automate. And right now we need Azure Powershell. With accomplishing this challenge helped me article from Keyth Mayer:

His solution is interactive script and a wizard which creates rule set based on user input. In my case I needed change the behavior and support simple requirement: to be able to run script recurently with well known configuration using the VSTS Release Management. As the trigger I decided to use simple timer scheduler.

Solution: Automatic continuous update of NSG rules

From the high-level perspective the solution is easy:

  1. Write a PowerShell script
  2. Create VSTS Release Definition which consists from one step: run the script from step 1

1. PowerShell script

How the algorithm works? First I delete all the rules created previously by automation, then I download new XML file with IP address ranges and finaly I add all the IP address ranges as a set of new rules. It means that NSG is never changed (just the rules inside). Update of the NSG is fired in the end of the script so that I do not have to be afraid of issues and unsuccessful partial update. The final script follows here:

$subscriptionId = 'xxx'
$nsgName = 'xxx'
$rgName = 'xxx'
 
Select-AzureRmSubscription -SubscriptionId $subscriptionId
$nsg = Get-AzureRmNetworkSecurityGroup -Name $nsgName -ResourceGroupName $rgName
 
# Download current list of Azure Public IP ranges
$downloadUri = "https://www.microsoft.com/en-in/download/confirmation.aspx?id=41653"
$downloadPage = Invoke-WebRequest -Uri $downloadUri -UseBasicParsing
$xmlFileUri = ($downloadPage.RawContent.Split('"') -like "https://*PublicIps*")[0]
 
$response = Invoke-WebRequest -Uri $xmlFileUri -UseBasicParsing
 
# Get list of regions & public IP ranges
[xml]$xmlResponse = [System.Text.Encoding]::UTF8.GetString($response.Content)
 
$regions = $xmlResponse.AzurePublicIpAddresses.Region
 
#$selectedRegions = $regions.Name | Out-GridView -Title "Select Azure Datacenter Regions ..." -PassThru
$ipRange = ( $regions | where-object Name -In "europewest" ).IpRange
 
$rulePriority = 300
$counter = 1
 
ForEach ($rule in $nsg.SecurityRules | where-object Direction -Eq 'Outbound') {
    If($rule.Name -like '*AllowAzureOutbound_*'){
        Remove-AzureRmNetworkSecurityRuleConfig -Name $rule.Name -NetworkSecurityGroup $nsg
 
        Write-Host("REMOVED NSG RULE " + $rule.Name)
    }
}
 
ForEach ($subnet in $ipRange.Subnet) {
 
    $rulePriority++
    $counter++
 
    $ruleName = "AllowAzureOutbound_" + $subnet.Replace("/","-")
 
    $nsgRule = New-AzureRmNetworkSecurityRuleConfig `
            -Name $ruleName `
            -Description "Allow outbound to Azure $subnet" `
            -Access Allow `
            -Protocol * `
            -Direction Outbound `
            -Priority $rulePriority `
            -SourceAddressPrefix VirtualNetwork `
            -SourcePortRange * `
            -DestinationAddressPrefix "$subnet" `
            -DestinationPortRange *
 
    $nsg.SecurityRules += ,$nsgRule
 
    Write-Host("ADDED NSG RULE " + $subnet)
 
    If ($counter -gt 490)
    {
        break
    }
}
 
If (!$error) {
    Set-AzureRmNetworkSecurityGroup -NetworkSecurityGroup $nsg
} else {
    Write-Host("NOTHING CHANGED BECAUSE OF ERROR")
}

I am not a PowerShell guru and probably the script could be written more elegantly and efficiently.

2. VSTS Release Definition

My Release Definition consists from one environment with one single step (Azure PowerShell task). This task connects to Azure Subscription and runs the script from step 1.

release-definition-s-taskem-azure-ps

It looks nice but there is a small catch. Current version of Azure PowerShell allows to create inline script with max length 500 chars. We have to hack a bit: open developer console in favorite browser and break the client validation.

SQL: Padding numbers with leading zeros (15 -> 00015)

You might find a better way, but how about:

= REPLACE(STR(15, 5, 0), ' ', '0')

STR(num, length, decimals) function converts the number to string of given length (padded with spaces) and given number of decimals.

Alternative?

= RIGHT('00000' + @number, 5)

Remember you should handle the formatting in presentation layer, but sometimes you might find this useful…

WinDbg: SOSEX Help – Command Reference

SOSEX is one of the few existing Windows Debugger extensions for managed code (.NET). It adds a few useful commands to the basic SOS, but its command reference is not easy to find online.
The list of its commands is available via !sosex.help command. You might find the resulting list useful when considering this extension for your debugging scenario:

0:000> !sosex.help
SOSEX - Copyright 2007-2015 by Steve Johnson - http://www.stevestechspot.com/
To report bugs or offer feedback about SOSEX, please email sjjohnson@pobox.com
Quick Ref:
--------------------------------------------------
bhi       [filename]                                     BuildHeapIndex - Builds an index file for heap objects.
bpsc      (Deprecated.  Use !mbp instead)
chi                                                      ClearHeapIndex - Frees all resources used by the heap index and removes it from memory.
dlk       [-d]                                           Displays deadlocks between SyncBlocks and/or ReaderWriterLocks
dumpfd    <FieldAddr>                                    Dumps the properties of a FieldDef structure
dumpgen   <GenNum> [-free] [-stat] [-type <TYPE_NAME>]   Dumps the contents of the specified generation
                   [-nostrings] [-live] [-dead] [-short]
finq      [GenNum] [-stat]                               Displays objects in the finalization queue
frq       [-stat]                                        Displays objects in the Freachable queue
gcgen     <ObjectAddr>                                   Displays the GC generation of the specified object
gch       [HandleType]... [-stat]                        Lists all GCHandles, optionally filtered by specified handle types
help      [CommandName]                                  Display this screen or details about the specified command
lhi       [filename]                                     LoadHeapIndex - load the heap index into memory.
mbc       <SOSEX breakpoint ID | *>                      Clears the specified or all managed breakpoints
mbd       <SOSEX breakpoint ID | *>                      Disables the specified or all managed breakpoints
mbe       <SOSEX breakpoint ID | *>                      Enables the specified or all managed breakpoints
mbl       [SOSEX breakpoint ID]                          Prints the specified or all managed breakpoints
mbm       <Type/MethodFilter> [ILOffset] [Options]       Sets a managed breakpoint on methods matching the specified filter
mbp       <SourceFile> <nLineNum> [ColNum] [Options]     Sets a managed breakpoint at the specified source code location
mdso      [Options]                                      Dumps object references on the stack and in CPU registers in the current context
mdt       [TypeName | VarName | MT] [ADDR] [Options]     Displays the fields of an object or type, optionally recursively
mdv       [nFrameNum]                                    Displays arguments and locals for a managed frame
mfrag     [-stat] [-mt:<MT>]                             Reports free blocks, the type of object following the free block, and fragmentation statistics
mframe    [nFrameNum]                                    Displays or sets the current managed frame for the !mdt and !mdv commands
mgu       // TODO: Document
mk        [FrameCount] [-l] [-p] [-a]                    Prints a stack trace of managed and unmanaged frames
mln       [expression]                                   Displays the type of managed data located at the specified address or the current instruction pointer
mlocks    [-d]                                           Lists all managed lock objects and CriticalSections and their owning threads
mroot     <ObjectAddr> [-all]                            Displays GC roots for the specified object
mt        (no parameters)                                Steps into the managed method at the current position
mu        [address] [-s] [-il] [-n]                      Displays a disassembly around the current instruction with interleaved source, IL and asm code
muf       [MD Address | Code Address] [-s] [-il] [-n]    Displays a disassembly with interleaved source, IL and asm code
mwaits    [-d | LockAddr]                                Lists all waiting threads and, if known, the locks they are waiting on
mx        <Filter String>                                Displays managed type/field/method names matching the specified filter string
rcw       [Object or SyncBlock Addr]                     Displays Runtime Callable Wrapper (RCW) COM interop data.
refs      <ObjectAddr> [-target|-source]                 Displays all references from and to the specified object
rwlock    [ObjectAddr | -d]                              Displays all RWLocks or, if provided a RWLock address, details of the specified lock
sosexhelp [CommandName]                                  Display this screen or details about the specified command
strings   [ModuleAddress] [Options]                      Search the managed heap or a module for strings matching the specified criteria

ListGcHandles - See gch

Use !help <command> or !sosexhelp <command> for more details about each command.
You can also use the /? (or -?) option on any command to get help for that command.